What Does M1 In Knitting Mean?

M1 stands for make one, and is a common abbreviation used in knitting patterns. It’s a simple way to increase the number of stitches on your needle, and is often used to create neat, symmetrical patterns.

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M1 in knitting: what does it mean?

M1 in knitting refers to a specific increase stitch. To work this stitch, you’ll need to insert your right-hand needle between the two stitches on the left-hand needle, then knit the loop that’s formed. This will create an extra stitch, which is ideal for increasing the size of your knitting project.

The difference between M1 and M1L/M1R

M1 refers to an increase stitch, while M1L and M1R refer to left and right slanted increases, respectively. M1 is worked by lifting the horizontal strand between the needles with the left needle, then knitting into the back of it. This creates a neat little hole that can be used as a decorative element in your knitting. M1L and M1R are both worked the same way, but the left slant is created by working into the front of the lifted strand, while the right slant is created by working into the back.

How to do the M1 increase

The M1 increase is a very commonly used knitting increase. It is a simple way to create an extra stitch in your knitting, and can be worked at the beginning or end of a row.

To work the M1 increase, you will need to use a spare piece of yarn (called a lifting loop) and insert it into the next stitch on your needles as shown.

Once you have inserted the lifting loop into the stitch, you will need to knit into this stitch as normal. This will create an extra stitch on your needle, and will also twist the two stitches together.

The M1 increase in action

The M1 increase is one of the most commonly used increases in knitting, and for good reason: it’s easy to execute and results in a neat, almost invisible seam. The main advantage of the M1 increase is that it can be worked into the fabric of your knitting without interrupting the stitch pattern, making it ideal for use in patterns with textured stitch work.

To work an M1 increase, you’ll need to insert your right-hand needle into the space between the stitches on your left-hand needle, from front to back. Next, knit into the back loop of the stitch on your left-hand needle and slip both stitches off of your left-hand needle. You’ve now increased by one stitch!

How to use M1 to make a hole in your knitting

If you’re a beginner knitter, you may have come across the term “M1” and been wondering what it means. M1 is a method of making a hole in your knitting, and it’s actually very simple to do.

Basically, M1 means to insert your needle under the strand of yarn between the two stitches on the needle, and then knit into that strand. This creates an extra stitch, which also creates a hole in your knitting.

You can use this hole to create buttonholes, or to create decorative details on your knitting. It’s really up to you!

So, now that you know what M1 means, why not try it out on your next project?

How to make an M1 decrease

The M1 decrease is a left-leaning decrease that uses one stitch. To make an M1 decrease, first insert the left needle into the front of the next stitch on the row below the first stitch on the right needle. Then knit through the back loop of this stitch (Figure 1). Next, knit the first stitch on the right needle (Figure 2), and slide both stitches off the needles (Figure 3).

How to use M1 to make a buttonhole

To make a buttonhole, you will need to use the M1 stitch. This stitch is made by picking up the strand of yarn between two stitches with your right needle and then knitting it. This will create an extra stitch on your needle. You can then knit or purl this stitch as normal.

M1 troubleshooting

If you’re having trouble with your M1 stitch, here are a few tips to try:

– Make sure your needle is inserted correctly. The M1 stitch is worked with the right needle inserted from back to front through the loop below the left needle.
– Be careful not to twist the stitch. When you work an M1 stitch, you’re essentially increasing the number of stitches on your needle by one. If you twist the stitch, you’ll end up with an extra loop on your needle, which will throw off your stitch count.
– Be consistent with your tension. When working an M1 stitch, it’s important to maintain even tension so that the new stitches don’t get too loose or too tight.

M1 variations

There are several ways to create the M1 increase, and which one you use is often a matter of personal preference. The two most common methods are the knit-front-and-back (Kfb) and make-one-left (MOL). These two methods will produce identical results, but they will create different types of stitches on the right and wrong sides of your work.

The knit-front-and-back (Kfb) method
This method is worked by knitting into the front and then the back of the same stitch, essentially increasing the stitch count by one. On the right side of your work, this method creates a basic knit stitch; on the wrong side, it creates a purl stitch.

To work a Kfb increase:

1. Knit into the front leg of the stitch below the one on your right needle, but don’t remove it from your left needle.

2. Knit into the back leg of that same stitch, and then slip both legs off your left needle. You’ve now increased one stitch.
The make-one-left (MOL) method
This method is worked by picking up a strand of yarn between two stitches with your left needle and knitting it through to create a new stitch on your right needle. On the right side of your work, this method creates a leaning decrease; on the wrong side, it creates a mirrored increase.

To work a MOL increase:
1. With your left needle, pick up the strand of yarn between the two stitches currently on your needles from front to back.

2. Insert your left needle into picked-up loop from bottom to top and knit it through as if making a basic decreases knit two together (k2tog) or slip slip knit (ssk). You’ve now increased one stitch

M1 in summary

M1 in knitting is a method of increasing stitches. It stands for Make 1, and there are several ways to do it. The most common way is to lift the bar between the two stitches (knitwise for a right-leaning increase, or purlwise for a left-leaning increase), place it on the left needle, and knit or purl into it. This creates a new stitch and also twists the two stitches together.

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