How to Read Knitting Charts

If you’re a knitting beginner, learning how to read knitting charts can seem daunting. But with our simple guide, you’ll be reading them like a pro in no time!

Checkout this video:

What are knitting charts?

Knitting charts are a graphical representation of a knitting pattern that can be used in place of written instructions. Charts can be very helpful when working with complicated patterns or when you want to see what the finished project will look like.

To use a chart, you will need to follow these steps:

1. Read the chart from right to left on odd-numbered rows, and from left to right on even-numbered rows.

2. Start at the lower right-hand corner of the chart and work your way up.

3. Knit the stitches that are shown in the color of your yarn, and purl the stitches that are shown in white.

4. Follow any special instructions that are given along the top or bottom of the chart.

How to read a knitting chart

As with most things in knitting, there is more than one way to read a chart. This is the method that works best for me, and the one I recommend to most knitters.

First, take a look at the chart and find the key. The key will tell you what each symbol on the chart represents. For example, in this key, a knit stitch is represented by a black square, and a purl stitch is represented by a white square.

Next, familiarize yourself with the layout of the chart. In this chart, each row is numbered, and each column is lettered. Starting from the bottom left-hand corner, read each row from left to right. In this example, you would knit 1 stitch on needle 1, then purl 1 stitch on needle 2, then knit 1 stitch on needle 3, and so on.

You will notice that some rows are marked with asterisks (*). These rows are called repeats, and you will need to repeat them until you have the correct number of stitches on your needles. In this example, you would repeat rows 3-6 until you have 24 stitches on your needles (3 repeats of 6 stitches).

Once you have reached the end of the row or repeat, start again at the bottom left-hand corner and work your way up to the top.

How to read a knitting chart for beginners

Knitting charts can look daunting to beginner knitters, but they are actually quite simple to read. Each square on the chart represents one stitch, and the symbols within the squares indicate what type of stitch it is. There are symbols for knit stitches, purl stitches, yarn overs, and decreases. To read a knitting chart, start by finding the key which will tell you what each symbol on the chart means. Once you know what the symbols represent, you can follow along row by row to knit your project.

Tips for reading knitting charts

Knitting charts are often used in patterns for complex stitch patterns, colorwork, or cable patterns. Although they may look daunting at first, with a little practice they are easy to read. Here are some tips to get you started:

-Take some time to familiarize yourself with the key at the beginning of the chart. This will tell you what each symbol on the chart represents.
-Start by looking at the overall pattern of the chart to get an idea of what it will look like. Is it a repeating pattern? How many stitches and rows does it repeat over?
-Then, take a closer look at each individual stitch and row. What do you need to do to create that stitch? Pay attention to any special instructions that may be noted on the chart.
-Once you have a good understanding of how to read the chart, you can start knitting! Remember to refer back to the chart often as you knit so that you don’t lose your place.

How to read a knitting chart for lace

There are a few things to know before you can start reading lace knitting charts. Knitting charts can be either written or charted, but most lace patterns are charted. Charts are read from the bottom up and from right to left on odd-numbered rows, and from left to right on even-numbered rows. If a chart is not written in this way, it will usually have a note at the top telling you which way to read it.

The next thing to know is what all the symbols on the chart mean. Each stitch is represented by a symbol, and most charts will have a key telling you what each symbol means. If there is no key, you can usually figure it out by looking at the stitches around it. For example, if there is a square next to a knit stitch, that square represents a yarnover (an increase).

Once you know how to read the chart, you can start knitting your lace!

How to read a knitting chart for cables

If you’ve ever been intimidated by a knitting chart for cables, this tutorial is for you. Cable knitting can produce beautiful, complicated-looking fabrics, but the process is really not that difficult. In fact, once you learn how to read a knitting chart for cables, you’ll see that it’s really just a matter of following a simple roadmap.

There are two things you need to know before you can start reading knitting charts for cables: which way the knit stitch leans (knit stitches lean to the right; purl stitches lean to the left), and how to read a key. Knitting charts are read from the bottom up, and from right to left on odd-numbered rows, and from left to right on even-numbered rows.

The key will tell you which symbols represent which stitches, and how many stitches to work for each symbol. For example, in the key below, the symbol “k2” represents a knit stitch, and the number “2” tells you that you should work two knit stitches.

Once you have all of this information, you’re ready to start reading knitting charts for cables. The first thing you’ll notice is that most knitting charts are divided into panels by vertical lines. These lines signify the edge of your fabric; in other words, they tell you where you need to turn your work.

Within each panel, there are horizontal rows of symbols that tell you which stitches to work and in what order. As we mentioned before, odd-numbered rows are read from right to left, and even-numbered rows are read from left to right.

To work a cable stitch, you will need to cross some stitches over others. For example, if the chart says “k6, c4b” (which is read as “knit six stitches; cable four back”), then you would knit six stitches normally, then cross four stitches over the six stitches that were just worked (to do this, simply hold those four stitches at the back of your work while working the next six stitch).

How to read a knitting chart for colorwork

Colorwork knitting charts can be intimidating to look at, but they don’t have to be! This guide will show you how to read a knitting chart for colorwork, so you can get started on your next project with confidence.

To start, you’ll need to identify the stitch pattern that you’ll be using. In this example, we’ll be using a basic 2x2 rib stitch. Once you’ve identified the stitch pattern, take a look at the chart and find the key. The key will show you what each symbol on the chart represents. In this example, the key shows us that the black squares represent knit stitches, and the white squares represent purl stitches.

Now that you know what the symbols on the chart mean, you can start following along. To do this, begin at the bottom left corner of the chart and work your way from left to right and from bottom to top. In our example, we would begin by knitting 2 stitches in our main color (black), then purling 2 stitches in our contrasting color (white). We would continue in this pattern until we reach the end of the row.

When you reach the end of a row on the chart, simply turn your work and begin again at the far left side of the chart. As you knit each row, you’ll see your stitch pattern begin to emerge. Continue working until you reach the end of the chart or until your project is complete!

How to read a knitting chart for intarsia

In order to knit intarsia, you will need to be able to read a knitting chart. Charts can be daunting at first, but they are really not that difficult to understand. This tutorial will show you how to read a basic knitting chart for intarsia.

To start, let’s take a look at a simple chart:

As you can see, this chart is made up of squares. Each square represents one stitch. In this case, the white squares representknit stitches, and the black squares represent purl stitches.

The first thing you need to do when reading a chart is to find the key. The key will tell you what each symbol on the chart represents. In this case, the key tells us that the white squares represent knit stitches and the black squares represent purl stitches.

Now that you know what each symbol on the chart represents, you can start reading the chart from left to right and top to bottom. In this example, you would start by knitting a purl stitch, then knitting two knit stitches together, then purling two stitches together, and so on.

It’s important to remember that charts are read from left to right and top to bottom. This means that if there is a row of all black squares followed by a row of all white squares, you would knit those two rows in Stockinette stitch (alternating betweenknit and purl stitches).

How to read a knitting chart for fair isle

Fair isle knitting is a technique that allows you to create intricate patterns with multiple colors of yarn. The key to fair isle knitting is reading charts, which are diagrams that show you which color to use and when.

Charts can be daunting at first, but they’re really not as complicated as they seem. Once you know how to read them, you’ll be able to knit fair isle patterns with ease!

Here’s a quick guide to reading fair isle knitting charts:

-Charts are read from right to left on every row.
-On odd-numbered rows (1, 3, 5, etc.), knit the stitches that correspond to the colors shown on the chart.
-On even-numbered rows (2, 4, 6, etc.), purl the stitches that correspond to the colors shown on the chart.
-When you come to a space on the chart, that means you should leave that color of yarn unworked.
-When there are two colors in a stitch, always work the background color first and then the foreground color.

Practice reading fair isle charts with this simple pattern:

How to read a knitting chart for brioche

Brioche knitting consists of two colors of yarn: a main color (MC) and a contrasting color (CC). The MC is typically worked on the right side (RS) of the fabric while the CC is mostly worked on the wrong side (WS), resulting in a stranded, two-color fabric.

Charts are used in brioche knitting to indicate both the placement of the stitches and which color yarn to use. Each square on the chart represents one stitch, and each color represents a different color yarn. In this example, green represents MC and purple represents CC.

Scroll to Top