How to Knit Lace – The Must Have Stitches

Learn the must have stitches for knitting lace. This easy to follow guide will have you knitting beautiful lace in no time!

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Introduction to lace knitting

Lace knitting is a type of knitting that uses yarn and needles to create a delicate, openwork fabric. It is usually made with lightweight yarns and requires patience and careful attention to detail.

There are many different types of lace stitches, and new stitches are being created all the time. Some of the most popular lace stitches include:

-Yo (yarn over): This stitch is used to create small holes in the fabric. It is often used as part of a decorative pattern.
-K2tog (knit two together): This stitch is used to decrease the number of stitches on the needle. It is often used to create pointed shapes in the fabric.
-SSK (slip, slip, knit): This stitch is also used to decrease the number of stitches on the needle. It forms a left-leaning decrease when worked on right-side rows, and a right-leaning decrease when worked on wrong-side rows.
-Purl two together: This stitch decreases the number of stitches on the needle and forms a right-leaning decrease when worked on right-side rows, and a left-leaning decrease when worked on wrong-side rows.

Lace knitting can be worked in any weight of yarn, from fingering weight to bulky weight. The size of needle you use will depend on the weight of yarn you are using – lighter weight yarns will require smaller needles, while heavier weight yarns will require larger needles.

The basics of lace knitting

Lace knitting is a type of knitting that uses yarn and features intricate patterns. These patterns are often made using lacework stitches, which are created by making small holes in the fabric. Lace knitting can be used to create a variety of garments, including shawls, wraps, blouses, and more.

If you’re new to lace knitting, it’s important to start with the basics. In this article, we’ll teach you how to knit lace by showing you some of the must-have stitches. Once you know these stitches, you’ll be well on your way to creating beautiful lace garments.

The different types of lace stitches

There are many different types of lace stitches, and each one has its own special effect. Some lace stitches are very open and airy, while others are dense and solid. Lace stitches can be worked in a variety of ways, either as a standalone stitch pattern or as part of a larger design.

The most important thing to remember when working lace is to keep your tension even. This can be tricky, especially if you’re new to lace knitting, but it’s essential in order to create beautiful, consistent stitches.

Here are some of the most popular lace stitches:

Shell stitch: This stitch is worked over multiple rounds and creates a scalloped edge.

Spiderweb stitch: This stitch is worked over multiple rounds and creates a web-like pattern.

Eyelet stitch: This is a very simple stitch that is often used as an edging. It’s worked over one round and creates small holes (or “eyelets”) in the fabric.

Openwork stitch: This type of stitch is very similar to eyelet stitching, but it’s worked over multiple rounds and creates larger holes in the fabric.

How to knit lace – the must have stitches

There are many different types of lace stitches, but there are a few that are essential for any knitter who wants to be able to create beautiful lace patterns. These stitches are relatively easy to master and once you have them down, you’ll be able to create a wide variety of lace patterns.

The first stitch you need to know is the yarn over. This is a very simple stitch that is used to createAn essential loop on your needle, which will later be Knit or purled together with other stitches to create openwork lacework. In order to do a yarn over, simply bring the yarn from the back of your work over the top of your right-hand needle. This will create a small loop on your needle. You can then proceed with your next stitch as usual.

The next must-know stitch is the K2tog (knit 2 together). This is a decrease stitch that is used to createWsWhen you knit 2 stitches together, it creates a left-leaning decrease in your work. This decreases the number of stitches on your needle by one and is often used in lacework to create odd-numbered rows or decrease the width of your fabric. To do a K2tog, insert your right-hand needle into the first 2 stitches on your left-hand needle as if you were going to knit them together. However, instead of just knitting them as one stitch, slide both stitches off of your left-hand needle and let them drop. You will now have one fewer stitch on your needle than you did before.

Another important lace stitch is the SSK (slip slip knit). This is a decrease stitch that is usedWSKTo createWhen you slip slip knit 2 stitches together, it creates a right-leaning decrease in your work decerningThe number of stitches on your needle by one and can often be seen in mirrored patterns or when decreases need to happen on both sides of your fabric simultaneously.. To do an SSK, insert your right-hand needle into the first 2 stsOn yoUleftNot as if you were going tO sliP 1 knitwise and then knit those 2 sts together through the back loops (tbl). However, instead of just knitting them as one stich, sliP both stitchesoffOf yOuRleftneedle letting thEmdrop., yOuhaving 1 fewer stichonNeedle

How to read a lace knitting pattern

In order to knit lace, you must first be able to read a lace knitting pattern. This can appear daunting at first, but with a little practice it will become second nature. The key to reading a lace knitting pattern is understanding the symbols and abbreviations that are used. These will vary depending on the designer, but there are some common ones that you are likely to see.

The first thing you need to do is familiarize yourself with the symbols and abbreviations that are used in lace knitting patterns. These can vary depending on the designer, but there are some common ones that you are likely to see. Once you know what these mean, you will be able to understand the instructions and knit your project successfully.

Here are some of the most common symbols and abbreviations that you will see in lace knitting patterns:

-k: knit
-p: purl
-st(s): stitch(es)
-yo: yarn over (this creates an extra stitch)
-ssk: slip, slip, knit (this decreases the number of stitches)
-k2tog: knit two together (this also decreases the number of stitches)
-LT: left twist (this is a stitch that crosses two other stitches)
-RT: right twist (this is a stitch that crosses two other stitches)

The benefits of lace knitting

Lace knitting has a lot of benefits that can be very useful for both beginners and experienced knitters. For one, lace is a great way to add interest and texture to your knitting. Lace can also be used to create beautiful, delicate garments or home decor items.

Lace is also a great way to practice your knitting skills. Because lace is often worked with lightweight yarns and small needles, it can be a good way to improve your knitting tension and gauge. Additionally, lace patterns often require you to use multiple different stitches, which can help you learn new techniques and become a more well-rounded knitter.

So whether you’re looking to add some interest to your knitting or just want to become a better knitter, lace knitting is a great option!

The challenges of lace knitting

Lace knitting is a beautiful but challenging technique. The main challenges of lace knitting are creating the openwork design and working with very fine yarns. The key to successful lace knitting is to use the right stitches and to be patient!

There are two basic types of lace stitches: increases and decreases. Increases are used to create the openwork design, while decreases give the fabric shape and structure. There are many different combinations of stitches that can be used to create a variety of lace patterns.

The most common increases used in lace knitting are yarn overs (yos). Yos are simply loops of yarn that are created by wrapping the yarn around the needle. decreases can be worked in a variety of ways, but the most common method is to knit or purl two stitches together (k2tog or p2tog).

In order to create more complex patterns, multiple yarn overs can be combined with decreases. For example, you could work a k3tog (knit three stitches together) followed by a yo (yarn over). This combination would create a small hole surrounded by threeknit stitches. By varying the number of stitches you knit or purl together, and by adding more yarn overs, you can create all sorts of different designs.

One of the challenges of working with very fine yarn is that it can be difficult to see your stitches. It is often helpful to use a contrasting colored waste yarn for your first few rows so that you can easily see your stitch pattern. Once you get started, take your time and be patient! Lace knitting is definitely a technique that takes some practice, but it is so worth it when you see your finished project!

Tips for knitting lace

Lace knitting is often thought of as being too difficult for the average knitter, but with a little patience and practice, lace knitting can be quite easy and very rewarding. The following tips will help you get started.

Lace knitting is usually worked on a smaller needle than is used for other types of projects. This creates a firmer fabric which is necessary for the delicate nature of lace.

Most lace patterns are written using charted symbols rather than words. These charts are designed to be read from the right side of the fabric, so it is important to become familiar with them before starting your project. Charts will often have both a right side and wrong side version to help you keep track of your place.

To maintain an even tension while knitting lace, it is important to use both hands. One hand should hold the yarn lightly while the other hand works the needles. This will help to prevent the yarn from becoming too tight or too loose as you knit.

When working with yarnovers, be sure to knit or purl them together with the next stitch as indicated in the pattern. This will help to close up any holes that might otherwise form in your fabric.

It is also important to block your completed lace project before wearing or gifting it. Blocking is a process of soaking and drying your finished item which helps toEven though blocking isn’t strictly necessary, it really does make a difference in how your final product looks. set the stitches into place and even out any irregularities in your work.

Troubleshooting lace knitting problems

As with any kind of knitting, sooner or later you will come across a problem with your lace knitting. Here are some tips on how to troubleshoot the most common lace knitting problems.

1. Laddering

This is when your stitches start to look like rungs on a ladder, with a space in between each stitch. It is usually caused by dropped stitches, and can be prevented by being extra careful when working with slippery yarns or delicate stitches. If you do drop a stitch, pick it up as soon as possible so that it doesn’t ladder down your work.

2. Holes

Holes can occur for several reasons, but the most common one is forgetting to yarn over when you should have. If you see a hole appearing, go back and yarn over the required number of times before continuing. Another cause of holes is when your stitches are too loose – if this is the case, try going down a needle size or two.

3. Tangled yarn

If your yarn keeps getting tangled, try winding it into a ball before you start knitting. This will help to keep the strand from getting tangled as you work. You can also try using a yarn guide – this is a small device that attaches to your clothing and feeds the yarn through so that you don’t have to hold onto it while you knit.

Resources for lace knitting

If you’re looking to add some excitement to your knit repertoire, lace knitting is the perfect way to do it. Lace knitting is all about creating delicate, intricate designs using a variety of stitches. And while it might seem daunting at first, once you get the hang of it, it’s really quite enjoyable.

To help you get started, we’ve put together a list of essential resources for lace knitting. From stitch dictionaries and pattern books to online tutorials and YouTube videos, these resources will have you churning out beautiful lace projects in no time.

Stitch dictionaries:

-A Treasury of Knitting Patterns by Barbara G. Walker – This classic stitch dictionary features over 200 lace stitches, along with instructions on how to use them.

-The Curious Nature of Knitted Lace by Ruth Freeman – This book explores the history and science of lace knitting, and includes over 60 original lace stitch patterns.

-Lace Style by Pam Allen and Ann Budd – This book features 25 knitting projects that showcase a variety of lace stitches, from simple to more advanced.

Pattern books:

-200 Ripple Stitches: A Creative Approach to Knitting by Margaret Flower – This pattern book features 200 different stitch patterns for creating rippled effects in your knitting.

-Feyaden’s Veils: An Anthology of 20th Century Lace Knitting by Anne Feitelson – This book features 20th century lace knitting patterns from a variety of designers, including Elizabeth Zimmermann, Lily Chin, and Sally Melville.

Online tutorials and videos:

-The basics of knitting lace (video) – In this helpful video tutorial from Creativebug, Andrea Rangel walks you through the basics of knitting lace, from choosing the right yarn and needles to working simple stitches like yarn overs and decreases.

-How to knit Estonian unikat rib (video) – In this video tutorial from droppedstitchesnl , Martina Behm walks you through how to knit Estonian unikat rib, a beautiful rib stitch with a twist.

-Knitting with beads (video) – In this video tutorial from Beaducation , Andrea Mielke shows you how to add beads to your knitting for a little bit of extra sparkle.

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