How to Knit for Left Handers

This blog will show you how to knit for left handed people. It is important to know how to do this so that you can make sure that your knitting is even and that you do not drop any stitches.

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Knitting for lefties: the basics

If you’re a lefty, you may have noticed that most knitting instructions and patterns are written for right-handers. But don’t despair! It’s not as hard as it seems to convert those patterns to work for you. With a little bit of practice, you’ll be a left-handed knitting pro in no time.

Here are some basic tips to get you started:

– To cast on (start your project), use your left hand to hold the yarn and your right hand to manipulate the needles.
– For knit stitches, insert the needle into the stitch from left to right, then yarn over (wrap the yarn around) the needle and pull through to create a new loop on the right needle.
– For purl stitches, insert the needle into the stitch from right to left, then yarn over and pull through.
– To increase or decrease stitches, follow the instructions for right-handers but do the opposite: if it says to knit 2 together (k2tog), purl 2 together (p2tog), etc., do that instead.
– When binding off (finishing your project), again follow the instructions for righties but do the opposite: if it says to knit 2 together, bind off 2 purlwise, etc.

With a little bit of practice, you’ll be ableto knit anything you want – and look good doing it!

Casting on and binding off

If you are a left-handed knitter, you may have noticed that most knitting patterns and instructions are written for right-handers. This can be a bit of a challenge, but don’t worry – it is possible to knit left-handed! With a little bit of practice, you’ll be able to follow most patterns and instructions with ease.

One of the first things you need to know is how to cast on and bind off. These are the basic steps for starting and finishing a knitting project.

Casting on
For right-handers, the “ knit stitch ” is the most common way to start a new row of knitting. However, this method can be a bit tricky for lefties. A better option is the “long tail cast on” method.

To do this, start by making a slipknot about 6 inches from the end of your yarn. Then, hold the yarn in your left hand with the slipknot at the base of your thumb. Insert the needle into the loop around your thumb, from front to back. Wrap the yarn around the needle (away from you) and pull it through the loop – you should now have two loops on your needle. Again, insert the needle into the loop around your thumb (from front to back) and wrap the yarn around it (away from you). Pull the yarn through both loops on your needle – you will now have one stitch cast on. Repeat this process until you have cast on the desired number of stitches.

Binding off
The “knit stitch” is also used to bind off, or finish a row of knitting. To do this, simply knit each stitch in turn until there is only one stitch remaining on your needle. Then, cut the yarn (leaving a tail of about 6 inches), and pull it through the final stitch – this will secure it in place.

The knit stitch

The knit stitch is the basis for all knitting, so it’s important to get confident with it early on. It’s actually very similar to the purl stitch, but it’s worked from left to right instead of from right to left. If you can master the purl stitch, you’ll find the knit stitch a breeze!

To work a knit stitch:
-With your yarn at the back of your work and your needle in your left hand, insert the needle into the front loop of the next stitch on your left-hand needle, from left to right
-Wrap the yarn around the needle (from front to back) and pull it through the loop, making sure not to let go of the other leg of the loop
-Now you have two loops on your right-hand needle. Insert your left hand needle into the front leg of the first loop on your right-hand needle and pull it off -You’ve now made one knit stitch!

The purl stitch

Most knitting patterns are written for right-handed knitters, which can be frustrating for left-handers. The good news is that it is relatively easy to adapt most patterns for left-handers. The key is to reverse all the instructions that are specific to the direction of the knitting.

The purl stitch is one of the basic stitches in knitting. To purl stitch, holding the yarn in your left hand, insert the needle into the next stitch from left to right. Wrap the yarn around the needle clockwise and then pull the needle through the stitch, taking care not to drop the stitch off the needle. You will now have two loops on your right-hand needle. Slip the first loop over the second loop and off the needle. You have now completed one purl stitch.

Increasing and decreasing

There are two main ways to increase and decrease stitches in knitting: the make one stitch (M1) method and the yarn over (YO) method. The M1 method is typically used for increases, while the YO method is typically used for decreases. However, both methods can be used for either purpose, so it’s really up to the knitter to decide which one to use.

For left-handed knitters, the M1 method is generally the easiest to use for both increasing and decreasing stitches. To increase stitches using the M1 method, simply insert your needle into the space between the last stitch you knit and the next stitch on the left-hand needle, then lift the strand of yarn between those two stitches onto your right-hand needle and knit it. For decreases, insert your needle into the next two stitches on your left-hand needle as if you were going to knit them together, then knit them together as normal.

The YO method is a bit more complicated but can be used for either increasing or decreasing stitches. To increase stitches using the YO method, simply bring your yarn forward between your needles (as if you were going to purl), then take your right-hand needle and insert it from back to front into the next stitch on your left-hand needle. You should now have two loops on your right-hand needle; just knit these two loops together as normal. For decreases using this method, simply knit two stitches together as normal, then bring your yarn forward between your needles before slipping the resulting stitch off of your left-hand needle.

Knitting in the round

Knitting in the round is a great way to create a seamless garment or fabric. If you’re a left-hander, you may find it a bit tricky to get started, but once you get the hang of it, it’s really not that different from knitting flat. Here are some tips to help you get started:

-Start by finding a circular knitting needle that is the correct size for your project. You can use either a set of double-pointed needles or a long circular needle.
-Cast on the number of stitches you need for your project using the long tail cast on method.
-Join your work by slipping the first stitch from the left needle onto the right needle and then passing the working yarn over the top of the right needle. You’ve now joined your work in the round and can start knitting!
-When you come to the end of a row, simply slip the last stitch from the left needle onto the right needle and start knitting again from the beginning.

knit every stitch

Reading knitting patterns

When left-handed knitters read traditional knitting patterns or instructions, they must mentally reverse all the steps. For example, when a pattern says ” knit 2 together,” a left-handed knitter would actually purl 2 together. Similarly, yarnovers and buttonholes are usually written as if done by a right-handed knitter and must be reversed for lefties.

Common knitting abbreviations

There are a few common knitting abbreviations that you will see when looking at patterns. These abbreviations can be confusing, so we’ve put together a quick guide to help you understand what they mean.

CO: Cast on
This is the process of putting stitches on your needle in order to start knitting.

K: Knit stitch
This is the most basic stitch and is simply done by inserting your needle into the next stitch on the left-hand needle, wrapping the yarn around the needle, and then drawing the yarn through the loop on the needle.

P: Purl stitch
The purl stitch is similar to the knit stitch, but instead of inserting your needle into the next stitch from front to back, you will insert it from back to front. Instead of wrapping the yarn around clockwise, you will wrap it around counter-clockwise. Draw the yarn through the loop on the needle to complete the purl stitch.

BO: Bind off
The bind off is used to finish a piece of knitting. It involves slipping stitches over one another until only one remains on your needle.

Knitting tips for lefties

Although most knitting instructions and patterns are written for right-handed knitters, it is possible for left-handed knitters to follow them with a little bit of adaptation. Here are some tips on how to knit for lefties:

-It can be helpful to hold the yarn in your left hand and the needles in your right hand, or vice versa. This allows you to use your dominant hand for the task that requires the most dexterity.

-When working with a pattern, you may need to “mirror” the instructions by working them from right to left instead of left to right. For example, if the pattern says to “knit 2, purl 2”, you would work it as “purl 2, knit 2”.

-If you are working with a pattern that is charted, you will need to flip the chart upside down so that it reads from left to right instead of right to left.

With a little bit of practice, you should be able to follow most knitting patterns regardless of which hand you use!

Troubleshooting your knitting

If you’re a lefty, you know that knitting can be a little bit more complicated than it is for righties. But don’t worry – with a little bit of troubleshooting, you can get the hang of it in no time!

One of the biggest issues that lefties face is that most knitting patterns are written for righties. This can be frustrating, but there are a few things you can do to make things easier. First, take a look at the pattern and see if it’s easily convertible – sometimes, all you need to do is switch which hand you hold the yarn in. If the pattern is more complex, there are lots of great resources online that can help you figure it out.

Another common issue is that lefties often have trouble keeping even tension on their stitches. This can result in uneven fabric, or even dropped stitches. The best way to combat this is by practicing – try different techniques and see what works best for you. And don’t be afraid to ask for help from other knitters – lefties or not!

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