How to Join Knitting in the Round Without a Gap?

How to Join Knitting in the Round Without a Gap? If you’re new to knitting in the round, there’s no need to be intimidated!

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Introduction

Knitting in the round is a great way to create seamless garments and accessories. However, if you’re not careful, you can end up with a gap where your work joins together. In this article, we’ll show you how to avoid that gap and get nice, clean stitches every time.

What is Knitting in the Round?

Knitting in the round is a method of knitting that creates a seamless tube of fabric. It is often used for projects like sweaters, hats, and scarves. When knitting in the round, you will use a circular needle or set of double-pointed needles (DPNs). The number of needles that you use will depend on the circumference of your project.

Joining your work without a gap is essential for projects like socks, where you don’t want a hole at the top of the sock. There are several methods that you can use to join knitting in the round without a gap. The method that you choose will depend on your personal preferences and the type of project that you are working on.

One common method is to knit the first two stitches together through the back loop (K2tog tbl). Another method is to slip one stitch knitwise, then knit into the second stitch on the needle before slipping it off (S1K1). You can also use an invisible seam such as the Kitchener stitch or three-needle bind off.

Once you have joined your work, you will continue knitting in the round until your project is finished. When you are ready to bind off, you can either do it manually or use a crochet hook to create an invisible bind off.

The Tools You’ll Need

Whether you’re starting a new project or adding on to an existing one, you’ll need to know how to join your knitting in the round without creating a gap. Unfortunately, if you don’t do it correctly, you may end up with a hole in your knitting that can be difficult (or impossible) to close up later.

Here are the tools you’ll need to join knitting in the round without a gap:
-A circular knitting needle (or set of double-pointed needles) in the size recommended for your pattern
-The yarn recommended for your project
-A tapestry needle
-Scissors

Casting On

There are two ways to start knitting in the round: with a gauge swatch or with a provisional cast-on. If you need to make a gauge swatch anyway, it’s easiest to start there. If you’re not sure if you’ll need a gauge swatch, or if you’re short on time, opt for the provisional cast-on.

Provisional Cast On:
This is my favorite method for casting on for circular knitting, because it’s easy and it guarantees there will be no gap between your stitches when you join. I like to use the crochet chain method, but you can also use waste yarn or a spare circular needle.

1. Make a slip knot and place it on your right needle.
2. Make a crochet chain with your waste yarn that is about 6 inches long. The number of chains doesn’t matter, as long as it’s easy to work with.
3. Place the slip knot on your crochet hook and slip stitch into the first chain to form a loop.
4. *With your working yarn (the yarn you’ll be using for your project), make a knit stitch into the next chain.*
5. Repeat from * to * until you have the desired number of stitches on your needles.
6. To close the circle, slip stitch into the first chain again and cut the yarn, leaving a long tail that you can weave in later.

Joining Without a Gap

There are a couple different ways that you can join your knitting in the round without creating a gap. The first is to use the knitted cast on method. To do this, you will need to cast on an additional stitch. Then, knit the first stitch on your needle together with the stitch you just cast on. This will close up any gap that might have been created.

Another way to join without creating a gap is to use the Crochet provisional cast on method. For this method, you will need to use a crochet hook and a waste yarn. Start by crocheting a loop with the waste yarn and then placing it onto your knitting needle. Then, knit your stitches as usual. When you come to the end of the round, you can remove the waste yarn and close up any gaps that might have been created.

Knitting in the Round

There are many ways to join knitting in the round without a gap, but the most common method is to use a slipped stitch. To do this, simply slip the first stitch of the round onto your right needle, then knit the next stitch together with the slipped stitch. This will close the gap and create a seamless join.

Finishing Up

Assuming you’re using the Magic Loop method, there are a few things you need to do in order to close up the gap at the join.

First, make sure that your last stitch is not twisted. You’ll know it’s twisted if the working yarn is coming from the wrong side of the stitch (i.e. underneath instead of over). If it is twisted, just knit that stitch again before proceeding.

Next, take your tail yarn and thread it onto a tapestry needle. Insert the needle into the first stitch on the left needle as if you were going to knit it, but don’t pull all the way through. Instead, just leave a loop on your right needle.

Now insert the needle into the first stitch on the right needle as if to purl and pull through, again leaving a loop on your right needle. You should now have two loops on your right needle and one loop on your left needle.

Finally, knit those two loops together and pull tight. You’ve now joined without creating a gap!

Knitting in the Round: Tips and Tricks

If you’re new to knitting in the round, the idea of joining your work without creating a hole or gap can be daunting. But have no fear! With a little bit of know-how, you can achieve a beautiful, seamless join every time. Here are some tips and tricks to help you get started:

-Before you begin, slip a stitch marker onto your needle to mark the beginning of the round.
-When you’re ready to join, make sure that your yarn is not too tight or too loose. The goal is to create a tension that is similar to the rest of your work.
-To join without a gap, you will need to “slip stitch” the first and last stitches together. To do this, insert your needle into the first stitch on the left-hand needle as if you were going to knit it. Then, insert your needle into the last stitch on the right-hand needle as if you were going to purl it. Finally, yarn over and pull through both stitches (two loops on your right-hand needle).
-Once you’ve joined the first and last stitches together, continue knitting around as usual. When you reach the end of the round, your work will appear seamless!

Knitting in the Round Patterns

Joining knitting in the round without a gap is a skill that every knitter should know. While it may seem daunting at first, it’s actually quite easy once you get the hang of it. There are a few different methods that you can use to join your work, but the most common is the slip stitch method.

To join your work using the slip stitch method, start by slipping the first stitch of your round onto your right-hand needle. Then, insert your left-hand needle into the second stitch on your right-hand needle and slip it off. Next, insert your left-hand needle into the slipped stitch and slip it onto your right-hand needle. You have now joined your work in the round without a gap!

If you’re looking for more interesting knitting in the round patterns, there are plenty of resources available online and in knitting magazines. One of our favorite sources for knitting in the round patterns is ravelry.com. Ravelry is a website and online community for knitters and crocheters where you can browse thousands of different patterns, add them to your favorites list, and even share your own creations!

FAQs

Q: What is the best way to join knitting in the round without a gap?

A: One of the best ways to join knitting in the round without a gap is to use the “make one” (or M1) increase. To do this, lift the strand between the needles with the left needle tip, then knit into the lifted strand. You can also use this method to close any gaps that might form while you’re knitting.

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