How to Join Knit in the Round

A step by step guide on How to Join Knit in the Round so you can avoid those pesky gaps in your projects!

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What is Knit in the Round?

Knit in the round is a popular technique for knitting circular or tube-shaped garments, such as sweaters, hats, and socks. It’s also used for creating pieces with helices or spirals, like the ribbing on a sweater. Instead of working back and forth on straight needles, you knit around and around on a circular needle. The steps below show you how to join yarn and start knitting in the round.

Why Join in the Round?

Joining in the round is often done at the start of a project, after completing a flat piece or when working with circular needles. It can be daunting, especially if you’re new to knitting, but there are only a few basic steps. And once you get the hang of it, you’ll be joining in the round like a pro!

There are many reasons why you might choose to work in the round. Perhaps you’re making a hat or a pair of socks and want to avoid seaming. Or maybe you want to try out some fun circular knitting techniques like Fair Isle or Intarsia. Whatever your reasons, there are a few things you should keep in mind before joining in the round.

How to Join in the Round

You can use either the knitted or the purl cast-on method when joining in the round. For a knitted cast-on, make a slip knot and place it on your left needle. Insert the tip of your right needle through the front leg of the stitch from bottom to top, then wrap the yarn around the needle as if to knit and pull through (1 stitch on right needle). *Insert needle into the front leg of the next stitch on left needle, wrap yarn around and pull through (2 stitches on right needle); repeat from * until you have the desired number of stitches. Place marker for beginning of round and join by knitting into first stitch (1 stitch increased).

For a purl cast-on, make a slip knot and place it on your left needle. *Wrap yarn around right needle as if to purl, insert tip of right needle into first stitch on left needle from top to bottom, then pull through both loops on right needle (1 stitch on right needle); repeat from * until you have the desired number of stitches. Place marker for beginning of round and join by purling into first stitch (1 stitch increased).

Tips for Joining in the Round

Continental knitters: Leaving a long tail (about 10 inches/25 cm), make a slipknot and place it on the needle. *Do not tighten the slipknot too much or it will be hard to knit into later.* Insert the needle into the first stitch on the other needle as if to knit, and yarn over. Now draw the yarn through both loops on the needle (as if you had just completed a knit stitch). You have now joined in the round and have one stitch on your needle.

To close the gap formed by the slipknot, work aknit stitch into it from right to left (i.e., purl-wise) on the next round.

English/throwing knitters: Leaving a long tail (about 10 inches/25 cm), make a slipknot and place it on your right-hand needle. *Do not tighten the slipknot too much or it will be hard to knit into later.* Using your left hand, hold both needles so that the tips point to your right and twist them once so that all of the stitches are facing clockwise. Take your left hand off of the working needle, holding only onto the tail needle, and insert it from left to right into the first stitch on the other needle as if to purl. Now yarn over and draw through both loops on needles (as if you had just completed a purl stitch). You have now joined in the round with one new stitch on your right-hand needle.

To close gap created by joining, work aknit stitch into it from left to right (i.e., knit-wise) on next round

Troubleshooting Joining in the Round

As you start your project, you may run into some problems with joining in the round. Here are some tips on how to troubleshoot joining in the round so that you can finish your project with beautiful results.

If your project is small, you may have difficulty joining in the round because there are not enough stitches to make a complete circle. In this case, you can add an extra stitch or two at the beginning and end of your row to make a complete circle. If your project is large, you may have difficulty joining in the round because there are too many stitches to make a complete circle. In this case, you can remove a stitch or two at the beginning and end of your row to make a complete circle.

If you find that your project is not lying flat after you have joined in the round, you can try blocking it. To block your project, wet it with water and then lay it out on a flat surface to dry. This will help to even out the stitches and make your project lie flat.

Projects to Knit in the Round

There are many reasons to knit in the round: it can be faster than knitting back-and-forth, it’s great for making seamless garments and hats, and it lets you try out new techniques like Fair Isle or intarsia without having to Knit flat. But before you can start your first in-the-round project, you need to join your yarn and set up your needles. Here’s how to do it.

More Information on Knit in the Round

There are many different ways to knit in the round, and the best method for you will depend on your personal preferences and the project you’re working on. In general, you can use either circular needles or double-pointed needles (DPNs) to knit in the round. If you’re using circular needles, you’ll need to make sure that the cord is long enough to accommodate all of the stitches in your project. For smaller projects, DPNs can be easier to use because you don’t have to worry about the cord getting in the way.

Once you’ve chosen your needles, it’s time to start knitting! To join your work in the round, simply start knitting from the first stitch on your needle. As you knit, be sure to slide your work so that the first stitch is always at the beginning of the needle. This will help prevent any gaps from forming in your work. Once you’ve made a few rounds, you can slip a stitch marker onto your needle to help keep track of where each round begins and ends.

Knitting in the round is a great way to create seamless projects like hats, socks, and sweaters. With a little practice, you’ll be able to create beautiful projects that are perfect for both beginners and experienced knitters alike!

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