How to Continental Knit

A step by step tutorial on how to continental knit, with pictures and video.

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What is Continental Knitting?

Continental knitting is a method of knitting in which the yarn is held in the left hand. This method is sometimes also called German knitting or left-handed knitting. It is believed to be the fastest method of knitting, and it is often used by competitive knitters.

The Benefits of Continental Knitting

There are many benefits to continental knitting, including that it is easier on the wrists, faster, and produces a more even fabric. Continental knitting is often used in combination with other methods, such as English or German knitting, to produce a fabric that has the best of both worlds.

The Basics of Continental Knitting

If you’re a fan of knitting, you’ve probably heard of continental knitting – but what is it, exactly? Continental knitting is a style of knitting that is said to be faster and more efficient than the more traditional English method. In continental knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand, and the working needle is in the right hand. This may feel strange at first if you’re used to holding the yarn in your right hand, but with a little practice, you’ll get the hang of it!

There are several benefits to continental knitting. For one, it can help you knit faster. In addition, it can also help you avoid tension problems and resultant pains in your hands and wrists. And finally, once you get used to it, continental knitting can actually be more relaxing than other methods – so it’s perfect for when you want to unwind with your needles.

If you’re interested in trying out continental knitting, here are a few tips to get you started:

-Start by holding your yarn in your left hand. If you’re not used to this, it may feel awkward at first, but stick with it! You’ll get used to it quickly.
-Use your thumb and index finger to control the tension of the yarn – this will take some practice, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll be able to knit more evenly and effectively.
-Once you have the yarn positioned correctly in your left hand, hold the needle in your right hand as usual. Now simply use the needle to “pick up” stitches from the strand of yarn – and start continental knitting!

Continental Knitting vs. English Knitting

There are two main ways to hold the yarn when knitting – the English way and the Continental way. In Continental knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand, and in English knitting, the yarn is held in the right hand. There are pros and cons to both methods, and it is really up to the individual knitter to decide which method works best for them.

Continental Knitting Patterns

Continental knitting, also known as German knitting or left-handed knitting, is a style of knitting in which the working yarn is held in the left hand. This can take some getting used to if you are accustomed to holding the yarn in your right hand, but many knitters find that continental knitting is faster and easier on the hands and wrists than the more traditional English style.

There are Continental knitting patterns available for all sorts of items, from sweaters and afghans to hats and mittens. If you’re looking for a challenge, you can even find Continental sock patterns. If you’re a left-handed knitter, you may find that Continental knitting comes more naturally to you than English style. However, there are plenty of resources available to help right-handed knitters learn this technique.

Tips for Continental Knitters

If you’re a new Continental knitter, or even if you’ve been knitting this way for a while, here are a few tips that might help you:

– Use a long, thin needle. This will help keep your tension even.

– Relax your grip. Again, this will help with even tension.

– Practice holding the yarn in different ways until you find the one that feels most comfortable for you. Some people hold the yarn in their left hand, some in their right hand; there is no correct way, so experiment until you find what works best for you.

– Knit slowly at first. This will help you get used to the continental knitting style and avoid making mistakes.

Troubleshooting Continental Knitting

Continental knitting, also known as German knitting, is a style of knitting in which the yarn is held in the left hand. This method can be faster than traditional English knitting, and many knitters find it less tiring on the hands and wrists. Continental knitting is often used in combination with throwing the yarn (rather than wrapping it around the needle) to create a very fast knitting style.

If you are new to continental knitting, you may find yourself having trouble with some of the basic techniques. This guide will help you troubleshoot some of the most common continental knitting problems so that you can get back to your project with confidence!

1. My stitches are too tight!

If your stitches are too tight, it is likely that you are not holding the yarn properly. When continental knitting, you should hold the yarn loosely in your left hand so that you can easily wrap it around the needle. If you are finding it difficult to wrap the yarn around the needle, try holding it between your thumb and first two fingers instead of resting it on your pinky finger.

2. My stitches are too loose!

If your stitches are too loose, it is likely that you are not wrapping the yarn around the needle enough. When continental knitting, be sure to wrap the yarn around the needle at least once before inserting it into the stitch. If your stitches are still too loose after practicing this wrapping technique, try using a smaller needles.

3. I dropped my stitch!

Dropping a stitch is more common whencontinental knitting because there is less tension onthe yarn. If you drop a stitch while continental knitting, simply insert your needle into the dropped stitch and lift it back up onto the needle. Be sure to hold onto both ends ofthe strand of yarn so that your stitch does not unravel further.

The History of Continental Knitting

Continental knitting is a style of knitting that is traditionally associated with Europe. In continental knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand, and the needles are stabbed into the yarn to form the stitches. This style of knitting is often faster than other methods, and it can be easier on the wrists as well.

Famous Continental Knitters

There are many famous continental knitters, including Julia Child, Elizabeth Zimmermann, and Sally Melville. Julia Child was taught to knit by her friend, Elizabeth Zimmermann, and she went on to become one of the most famous knitters in the world. Sally Melville is another well-known continental knitter who has written several books on the subject.

Resources for Continental Knitters

If you are new to the continental style of knitting, there are a few resources that can help you get started.

This type of knitting is often referred to as “throwing,” because the working yarn is held in the left hand and the stitches are “thrown” or picked up with the right needle. This can take some getting used to, but there are a few tips that can help make the transition a little smoother.

One of the most important things to keep in mind is that your tension will be different when continental knitting. This is because you are not holding the yarn in your knitting hand, so you will need to adjust accordingly. It may take some practice to find the right tension, but it will be worth it in the end!

There are a few great resources for continental knitters, including books, websites, and even YouTube videos. Start by doing a little research to find the resources that work best for you and then get started on your journey to becoming a continental knitter!

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